Mad Hatter’s Tea Party

Mad Hatter's Tea Party

Dress up, show up and enjoy a lavish Mad Hatter’s Tea Party at Tea Tree Gully Library on July 8

Calling all Mad Hatters, Alices and March Hares! Get your Cos-play on and join us on a trip down the rabbit hole for a tea party. It’s going to be mad, quirky and rather insane and will honour this year’s 150th anniversary of Alice in Wonderland.

Plus, you’ll be helping us raise funds for Oxfam’s Nepal relief. We’re hoping to hit our target of $300 so be generous and make a donation  https://my.oxfam.org.au/fundraiser/view/3303

When: Wednesday 8 July, 4-5.30pm
Open to young people 13-25.

Book online or phone 8397 7333

An evening with Alice

Presented by Catlin Langford, enthusiast and collector.

1book28 White rabbit

Illustrations by Sir John Tenniel from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, 1865: The Queen of Hearts and the White Rabbit.

ingpenAlicecvr   Alice-In-Wonderland-1972-Movie

Illustrated by Robert Ingpen, 2009          Film, Alice In Wonderland, 1972.

When:  Wednesday 8 July from 6.30 – 7.30pm.

Where:  Relaxed Reading Area, City of Tea Tree Gully Library.

Cost:  Free.  Bookings are essential.

2015 marks 150 years since the publication of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, considered as one of the most famous works of children’s literature. An Evening with Alice will investigate the numerous ideas, people, food, and paintings that inspired Carroll’s celebrated work of literature, providing an insight into topics as diverse as the Pre- Raphaelite group, to the not-so-beautiful turtle soup, to poisonous hats, and pet wombats.

You can book for An Evening with Alice here or telephone the Library on 8397 7333.

If you are of a crafty disposition, enjoy a sweet treat and are interested in everything ‘Alice’, READ ME.

RIP Sir Christopher Lee

220px-Christopher_Lee_at_the_Berlin_International_Film_Festival_2013The Tea Tree Gully Library was saddened to learn of the passing of legendary actor Sir Christopher Lee this week.

Born on May 27, 1922, Lee is perhaps best known today for his roles as Count Dooku/Darth Tyrannus in the Star Wars franchise and playing Saruman the White in both the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit trilogies, but these were just a handful of the more than 270 roles Lee has played over a career spanning seven decades.

Along with Peter Cushing, Lee was a staple of British Horror Studio Hammer Films, playing roles in their productions of Frankenstein, The Mummy, Rasputin: The Mad Monk, The Hound of the Baskervilles and To The Devil a Daughter. Perhaps his most famous role however was as Count Dracula in Hammer’s The Horror of Dracula. He would go on to play the Vampire King no less than six more times for Hammer.

Related to James Bond creator Ian Fleming by marriage, Lee was Flemings choice to play the role of Doctor No in the first film adaption of Bond. Though the role eventually went to Joseph Wiseman, Lee would eventually appear in The Man With The Golden Gun, as the villainous assassin Scaramanga.

In his autobiography, Lord of Misrule, Lee considered The Wicker Man to be the best film he had made.

A lover of Heavy Metal music, Lee had recorded four albums and three EPs before his death, including A Heavy Metal Christmas and Charlemagne: By the Sword and Cross which won him the ‘Spirit of Metal’ award at the 2010 Metal Hammer Golden God awards.

Lee passed away on June 7, 2015. He was 93 years old.

Why We Write? An author panel Wed 17 June 6.30pm

writingThe Tea Tree Gully Writers group are hosting a special panel featuring some of their published authors at a special event this coming Wednesday night.

The panel features published authors and poets including Maureen Mitson, Jill Wherry, Douglas Allington, Rhonda Pooley and will be chaired by Rick Coy.

They will talk about their experiences, why they write, what inspires them, who they read and so on. Cheese and Wine supper supplied.

You can book online here.

Here’s a bit of a bio about our panellists:
Rick Coy.  Whilst most of Rick’s output over the years has been text books and work books for schools, since he retired he has been concentrating on more creative writing.  His seminal work on humour, “Make ‘em Laugh, Make ‘em Laugh!” was published in 2012.

RhondaPooleyphotoRhonda Pooley.  As a lover of the English language and an editor of some repute, Rhonda is in much demand, but she loves to write and her book “Cambodian Harvest” was published in 2014.  Her short story “Epiphany” was runner up in the Tabor National Short Story Competition and her “Year of the Gazelle” was highly commended in the Langhorne Creek Writers’ Festival.  She is currently writing a novel of historical fiction.

Maureen MitsonMaureen Mitson. Maureen Mitson has had two books launched at the Library, ‘Paper Chase’ in 2012 and ‘Jumping the Cracks’ in 2014. Her short stories have been accepted for radio in Adelaide, Brisbane and Cairns, and poetry selected for popular anthologies. Her first full length novel, an historical saga, paralleling a fictional character with one of our State’s influential feminists, Mary Lee, and entitled ‘Awakenings’ has been accepted by Ginninderra Press.

Jill-Wherry-smallJill Wherry.  Being mainly a poet (and a performance poet at that) Jill’s work has been featured at poetry slams, writers’ festivals and performance poetry shows around the state.   A large number of her comic poems and limericks have been prize winners and have been collected in her books “Definitely Not Shakespeare” and recently “40 Reasons to Smile” and her CD “Crows Cap”.

Douglas Allington.  Douglas has been writing poetry for forty years and his most recent awards were a ‘Highly Commended’ in the 2013 Gawler Poetry Competition and another ‘Highly Commended’ in the 2014 Langhorne Creek Writers’ Festival.

Book Review: Messenger, The Legend of Joan of Arc

messenger

A graphic novel written by Tony S. Lee and illustrated by Sam Hart.

Joan of Arc was called The Messenger. In 1424, during the time of the Hundred Years War, 13 year old Joan claimed an angel visited her.  Her life’s purpose was to deliver messages from God. She was to take up arms, lead the French army to defeat the English invaders and their Burgundian allies, in order to free her country and place Charles VII on the throne of France. Unfortunately Joan’s life would be short and she would die a tragic death.

Did Joan really hear voices from God and the Saints or was she suffering from schizophrenia? Either way, her achievements were remarkable for a young, illiterate peasant girl with no military training, in medieval France.

Based on historical documents, including letters dictated by Joan during her imprisonment and the original transcripts of Joan’s trial for heresy before her execution, Messenger, The Legend of Joan of Arc is a powerful story. It tells Joan’s story from her time living with her family in the village of Domremy in northern France, to her campaign to convince the local authorities and Charles VII of her divine mission. You then experience Joan’s adventures on the battlefield and her eventual capture, trial and burning at the stake.

It is impossible to read Messenger, The Legend of Joan of Arc without having empathy for Joan. You will be outraged by her unnecessary death, due to the hypocrisy and treachery of the Catholic Church and appalled by the politics of war that lead to her betrayal by Charles. Joan’s love for her country, bravery and devout faith comes through to the reader in the narrative, as well as her acceptance of her coming death. The final page tells us about Joan’s legacy.

Use of colour is simple but the muted hues of watercolour reflect the moods of the story. For example, a battle will be portrayed in shades of red and yellow as opposed to the sombre tones of blue and purple used during the dark times of Joan’s trial for heresy. Language is designed for the modern reader.

Messenger, The Legend of Joan of Arc will make you think about true courage and strength of character, as opposed to weakness, corruption and the abuse of power. You will reflect on the rights of women and the value of life. You can read this exciting graphic novel through the One Card Network. Reserve it through the online catalogue or enquire at the Library.

Baby Bounce babies learn quick and develop skills fast

Baby Bounce

Some of the regulars who attend Baby Bounce at Tea Tree Gully Library

The benefits of Tea Tree Gully Library’s Baby Bounce and Rhyme program are immense for babies and their mothers. In 2014 the Library added a third weekly session of Baby Bounce due to demand – and ever since, that session (Friday 12-12.30pm) has become our most popular timeslot!

Baby Bounce regular Elizabeth Cragg-Sapsford, from Modbury North brings baby daughter Lillian to a session every week. She said she was the first in her group of friends with children to hear about Baby Bounce and give it a go.

We sat and spoke with Elizabeth, where she told us more about the benefits Baby Bounce has had on her daughter:

‘Lillian loves it. She does all the actions and is a quick learner. You just have to say ‘Open shut them’ to her and she starts doing the actions.

‘I love to be busy and I love to engage Lillian. Baby Bounce is free and it’s at a good time for me on a Thursday – it fits in with my life and my to-do list. It’s part of our routine.’

Lillian was born premature, and even though doctors had recommended various specialists and programs at leading Adelaide hospitals to improve her development skills, Elizabeth says she’s never required them.

‘Lillian was a premmie baby and since doing Baby Bounce she hasn’t had to go to any special development appointments or classes at the hospital. She hasn’t needed it. She has the same language skills and sounds as any other baby her age. She can make heaps of different sounds. When she says ‘hi/bye’ it’s really clear. Same when she says ‘mum or dad’.

Growing up, Elizabeth was surrounded by a family deeply involved in music, something she wanted Lillian to experience as early as possible.

‘Baby Bounce puts music into her life, it’s like music therapy. She’s doing so well.

‘At the hospital they offered a pediatric class and physio/speech therapy sessions for early born babies and I haven’t had to do that at all with Lillian or give her any special intervention.

‘Seeing Lillian engage in singing and nursery rhymes has been great. She wasn’t a baby who initially slept well. Now she seems more relaxed and settles easily.

‘I’ve met another lady through Baby Bounce and we’ve become close and now we have formed a friendship group. All of the kids get along really well.’

It heartens Elizabeth to see Lillian’s bright eyes, smiling face and quick responses at the Baby Bounce sessions, which she plans to keep attending, until she’s ready for the next level – Toddler Time!

‘I think the group sessions work. I could have looked up nursery rhymes on YouTube and played them to her but then she wouldn’t have had the group stimulation or seen all the babies around her doing all the actions. It’s definitely helped me as a mother, taking her to the Baby Bounce sessions and participating in a group and something bigger.

‘She loves it – she’s already starting to clap when we walk into the library.’

Baby Bounce is held at the Tea Tree Gully Library three times every week. It is an interactive way for parents and carers to introduce babies to the enjoyment of sharing nursery rhymes, action songs and simple percussion instruments. Sessions are lively, interactive and stimulating for both babies and carers. For ages 0-2 years.

Times:

Wednesday: 10:30am – 11am

Thursday: 10:30am – 11am

Friday: 12 -12.30pm

Baby Bounce sessions are all free! No bookings are required. Please arrive at least 15 minutes early to get a seat. Please note sessions are only held on Thursdays during school holidays.

What’s it like to volunteer at the Library?

Last week Tea Tree Gully Library celebrated National Volunteer Week, and all of the good work they do. The Library simply could not function without the devotion and energy of our volunteers, who come from many different backgrounds and ages. One of our youngest volunteers is Sophie, who recently gave us some feedback on her experience helping with the Library’s Digital Hub. We would like to encourage anyone interested in volunteering at the Library, or another council-run facility, to visit the Volunteer Vacancies website

Tell us a little bit about yourself. Where are you from and how did you come to end up as a volunteer at the Tea Tree Gully Library?

Hi, I’m Sophie!  I spend my Tuesday afternoons volunteering at the Digital Hub in Tea Tree Gully library.  I’m originally from Canada but moved here from England where I lived for four years, after having lived in Upstate New York for 11 years!

While visiting the Tea Tree Gully website I saw an ad about volunteering at the Digital Hub, and after making a phone call, meeting up with some coordinators, and having an interview, I was in!

What kinds of things do you provide volunteer assistance with at the library?

I work at the Digital Hub, helping mostly seniors learn how to use technology more effectively on  iPads, laptops, computers, iPods, or phones.

You are one of our youngest volunteers at the library, and you work with some of our most elderly customers. Is the age gap an issue and are people shocked when they see how young you are? 

The age gap doesn’t seem to be a problem in the least!  I think the elderly people love seeing a young face.  Sometimes when someone arrives for a lesson, even though I am right there, they stand around and seem to be wondering where their teacher is!  I approach them with a smile and ask them, “Are you here for the Digital Hub?”  I sometimes receive a surprised look but they don’t seem to mind at all.

What is it about volunteering you enjoy – where do you get your moments of joy?

It is such a joy to be able to explain things and solve problems that have been such a pain to the customer.  I love seeing the excitement on their face when they understand how to navigate or use a certain product.  It is always fun to amaze them with handy new tricks like copy and pasting (my most popular one)! I love hearing positive reports from staff members about people who have really appreciated a session.

What are some of the challenges with volunteering?

I think the biggest challenge is thinking up solutions on the spot and figuring out how to explain them as clearly as I can.

You are so young and the world is your oyster. Why have you made the choice to volunteer at such a young age, rather than go out and party, enjoy your hobbies and friends?

I thought volunteering would be the perfect way to get a taste of what a job might be like.  And I am actually enjoying my hobbies at the hub by teaching and exploring technology!  I have even met some lovely new people whom I am getting to know. I enjoy my regular customers!

What would you say to someone who is interested in volunteering, but is slightly hesitant about giving it a go?

Don’t let an opportunity such as volunteering pass you by!  It is a perfect way to get some great experience and meet some lovely people along the way.  You will never regret doing something that is not just beneficial for yourself but also for the many people who you will be helping.  It doesn’t hurt to give volunteering a try but you will probably end up continuing once you’ve started!